The History of These Ancient Temples is Truly Fascinating

Among the earliest structures built by ancient civilizations, places of worship like tombs and temples were perhaps of the highest importance for the population of those days. In fact, of the buildings that still remain today from the early years of civilization, ancient temples are the most captivating and spectacular. You still can find several of the oldest known temples, built thousands of years ago, in different parts of the world today. While not all of them have been well-preserved, they still hold a magical allure and tell us of mysterious stories.. These old temples also help us get a better understanding of humanity’s earliest societies and what the world was like in those times. Some of the ancient temples featured in the list below are older than the written word itself, some have been built underground, and some have been able to maintain their architectural splendor even after thousands of years. Of all these ancient structures I only got the chance to visit The Temple of Apollo in Greece while taking a long trip throughout the country. It’s truly an amazing place! Take a look.

Temple of Amada, Egypt

The Temple of Amada is one of the oldest temples in Egypt and was first constructed by Egyptian pharaoh Thutmose III of the 18th dynasty, sometime around the 15th century BC. Dedicated to the gods Amun and Ra-Horakhty, the temple is considered to be one of the earliest examples of Egyptian temple architecture in the area of the Middle Nile. While it was originally constructed on the east bank of the Nile, the Temple of Amada was moved in the 1960s and ’70s to a higher site on Lake Nasser to protect it from flooding. One of the most significant features of the temple is a relief along with two important inscriptions describing the military feats of the pharaohs who built it – Tuthmosis III and his son Amenhotep II. While the temple is quite small and dilapidated, it is still quite fascinating and vibrant from inside.

Luxor Temple, Egypt

Located on the east bank of the Nile River in Luxor, in the ancient city of Thebes, the Luxor Temple was built in 1,100 and 1,600 BC during the reigns of several pharaohs – Amenhotep III (1390-52 BC), Tutankhamun (1336-27 BC), and Horemheb (1323-1295 BC), and then added to by Rameses II (1279-13 BC). The temple was dedicated to the three Egyptian gods Amun, Mut, and Chons, and is considered the largest and most important site in ancient Egypt.The Luxor temple served as a place of worship for nearly 3,500 years and was also the center of the festival of Opet (ancient Egyptian festival of the second month of the lunar calendar). According to Egyptian legends, the Luxor Temple was “the place of the First Occasion,” where the god Amun experienced a rebirth. Today, the massive Great Colonnade Hall is one of the most vital remains of this vast temple complex.

Hypogeum of Ħal-Saflieni, Malta

Image Source: Flickr/xiquinhosilva

Built around 2,500 BC, the Hypogeum in Malta is the oldest prehistoric underground temple in the world. The island of Malta has several Megalithic Temples and this structure is easily one of the most remarkable ones. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Hypogeum is one of the world’s best-preserved prehistoric sites and contains halls, chambers and passages carved out of rock. Archeologists believe that the Hypogeum was used as a temple as well as a sanctuary and a necropolis in prehistoric times. The complex is divided into three levels – the upper level (3600-3300 BC), the middle level (3300-3000 BC), and the lower level (3150 -2500 BC). Amazingly, the lower level has a room that is 10.6 meters (35 ft) underground. The structure was rediscovered in 1902 and was restored over mid-2016 to early 2017. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980.

Temple of Apollo, Greece

The Temple of Apollo is located at Delphi, the center of the Ancient Greek world, and was built on the location of two earlier temples. The temple was first built around the 7th century BC by the two iconic architects Trophonios and Agamedes and was rebuilt after a fire in the 6th century BC. The temple was of the Doric order and had 6 columns at the front, and 15 columns at the flanks.In 373 BC, the Temple of Apollo was destroyed by an earthquake and was rebuilt for the third time in 330 BC. Even after so many centuries, the foundations of the iconic temple still survive today along with several Doric columns that are made of porous stone and limestone. Not much is known about the temple’s interior arrangement. However, ancient writers have mentioned that the walls of the temple were inscribed with the aphorisms of the seven sages.

Tchogha Zanbil, Iran

Tchogha Zanbil or Choga Zambil is a ruined palace and temple complex of the ancient Elamite city of Dur Untashi in Iran. Built in 1250 BC, the temple was founded by the Elamite king Untash-Napirisha (1275-1240 BC). The primary feature of the complex is a gigantic ziggurat (a rectangular stepped tower built to honor the main god of the city) dedicated to the Elamite divinities Inshushinak and Napirisha. Outside of Mesopotamia, the ziggurat at Tchogha Zanbil remains the best-preserved monument of this type.Incidentally, the city was never completed and was attacked and damaged by the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal around 640 BC. The temple complex was excavated between 1946 to 1962 by archaeologist Roman Ghirshman after prospectors for an oil company discovered it in 1935.

 Vittala Temple, India

The Vittala Temple or Vitthala Temple in Hampi, India, is located near the banks of the Tungabhadra River in Karnataka. Among the many ancient temples at Hampi, the Vittala temple is the most well-renowned because of its stunning architecture and unmatched craftsmanship.Built in the 15th century by King Devaraya II (1422- 1446 AD) of the Vijayanagara Empire, the temple is dedicated to Lord Vittala or Krishna and is known for its iconic stone chariot and the unique musical pillars. Many sections of the temple were expanded and renovated during the reign of Krishnadevaraya (1509- 1529 AD). The temple is amazingly well-preserved and represents the epitome of ancient Indian architecture.

source of inspiration and reference : ba-bamail.com

Cristina David

Fascinating Facts About Paris

Thomas Jefferson once said, “a walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of life.” He wasn’t wrong. There’s a reason that Paris is one of the most popular cities in the world and captivates all of us. Known as the “City of Light” or the “City of Love,” the streets of Paris gush with culture, art, beauty, and history. 

While we have all seen glorious pictures of the French capital, but there’s still a lot you may not know about it. For instance, did you know that Paris wasn’t always called “Paris”? And do you know what the city’s motto is? Here, we have listed some little-known and interesting facts about Paris that you are unlikely to know. Check them out./

1. Pont Neuf is the oldest bridge in Paris

Pont neuf, Ile de la Cite, Paris – France

It was built from 1578 to 1607 and was designed by Baptiste Du Cerceau and Pierre des Illes. It was the city’s first path-breaking public work and introduced them to a new kind of street life.

2. The motto of Paris is “Fluctuat nec mergitur”

small paris street with view on the famous paris eifel tower on a cloudy rainy day with some sunshine

This means ‘Tossed but not sunk,’ or ‘Beaten by the waves, but does not flounder.’ This phrase is most commonly found on Paris’ coat of arms and suggests resilience, courage, and inner strength. 

3. Paris was founded around the end of the 3rd century BC and was initially called Lutetia.

Paris cityscape taken from Montmartre

The city was founded around the end of the 3rd century BC by a Celtic tribe called Parisii who had settled on the banks of the Seine. In 52 BC, the village was conquered by the Romans, who went on to establish it as a Gallo-Roman town called Lutetia. The city changed its name to Paris during the 4th century.

4. Paris was among the first cities in the world to install street lights.

It is said that the first public lamp in Paris was the famous candle lantern placed in front of the Grand Chatelet in 1318. The first gas lamps were placed in the Place du Carrousel in 1829. By 1900, there were around 50,900 street lamps in Paris.

5. The oldest house in Paris was built in 1407

51 rue de Montmorency

The house is located at 51 rue de Montmorency and was built by the city’s most famous alchemist, Nicolas Flamel, in 1407. Historians believe that this is the house where Flamel carried out his experiments in alchemy.

6.The oldest café in Paris has been around since 1686

Café Procope is the oldest and among the most famous eateries in the city. It is known as the first literary cafe in the world and was opened in 1686 by the Sicilian chef Procopio Cutò. The café is said to have played a major part in setting up the café culture in Paris.

7. Cheese shops in Paris have more than 1000 different varieties of French Cheese

Wine and Cheese Shop – French Wine and Cheese Shop in Paris

You will be spoilt for choice when looking for French cheese in Paris. From the soft and creamy Camembert to the rich and firm Comté, you won’t be able to try out all the varieties in one trip.

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source : https://www.ba-bamail.com

Cristina David