5 Spectacular Rock Formations

On earth there is no heaven, but there are pieces of it.— Jules Renard

While I have a great appreciation for manmade wonders, nothing comes close to the beauty of the natural world.

We all yearn to spend time in nature, and thankfully there’s no shortage of incredible sights to enjoy; from mighty mountains and roaring waterfalls to thick forests and beautiful beaches, we’re spoiled for choice. In this article, we will explore one natural phenomenon in particular—rock formations.

Whether for their shape, components, location or beautiful surroundings, tourists have long been drawn to these spectacular-looking rocks. Many of them are huge, and viewing them is breathtaking. Here, I endeavour to showcase 10 of the most incredible rock formations in the world.

1 Church Rock – Utah

Photo – Internet

Church Rock is a solitary column of sandstone in southern Utah along the eastern side of U.S Route 191, near the entrance to the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. This 200 foot roadside oddity near Monticello is called Church Rock.

Photo – Internet

2 Aphrodite’s Rock (Cyprus)

This is one of the most famous spots in Pafos, a coastal city in Cyprus. It is also known as Petra tou Romiou, which means ‘Rock of the Greek.’ Its popularity is linked with Greek mythology and the belief that Aphrodite—the goddess of love, beauty, procreation and pleasure—was born here. There is a belief that swimming around Aphrodite’s rock brings one eternal beauty.

3 Old Harry Rocks (England)

Photo – Internet

Old Harry Rocks can be seen up close on foot by walking from either Studland or Swanage across Ballard Down, a gorgeous chalk grassland . This UNESCO World Heritage site at the end of the Jurassic Coast is simply spectacular.

Further south from Old Harry Rocks along the South West Coast Path is the charming coastal town of Swanage, and beyond that Durlston Country Park and Dancing Ledge.

Old Harry Rocks is a spectacular cliff formation and one of the best places to visit on the Jurassic Coast. This is the very eastern end of the Jurassic Coast and the white chalk rocks gleam brightly in the sun.

Thousands of years ago, Old Harry Rocks and the Needles on the Isle of Wight were linked by a line of chalk hills that eroded away. What’s left is a series of impressive rock stacks and cliffs. Old Harry Rocks can be reached from South Beach Car Park at Studland Bay and its a 1 mile walk along the fields and grasslands to reach the clifftop, with great views over Studland Bay  along the route (a 4 mile stretch of golden sand).

4 Uluru Ayers Rock (Australia)

Photo – Internet

Visit one of the greatest natural wonders of the world, Uluru. Not only is it a spectacular natural formation, Uluru is a deeply spiritual place. You can feel a powerful presence the moment you set eyes on it.

At 348 metres high, Uluru is one of the world’s largest monoliths, towering over the surrounding landscape and some 550 million years old.

Made of sandstone, Uluru is often referred to as the heart of the ‘Red Centre’ and is one of Australia’s most recognisable landmarks. Breathe in, see the colours change before your eyes, hear the stories of time and be amazed as Uluru captures your heart.

For the local Aboriginal people, the Anangu, World Heritage-listed Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park holds a special cultural significance where earth and memories exist as one.

Feel the connection to the land as this iconic rock formation hides ancient wisdom and diverse plant and animal life. Discover an awe-inspiring landscape where creation stories are whispered on the winds.

5 The Arbol de Piedra (Bolivia)

Photo – internet

The Arbol de Piedra is another stunning example of geological erosion; over millennia, strong winds have rendered this volcanic rock formation thin at its base. Situated in the Desierto Siloli in Bolivia about 4,600 metres above sea level, the uniqueness of this isolated rock lies in its resemblance with a stunted tree.

Beside the salt flats of Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest salt flat, you’ll find the stunning landscape of the Siloli Desert, a starkly contrasting scene to that of the vast white salt flats. Here, at the Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve entrance you will find crazy rock formations that come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. The stand out among these different volcanic rock figures is the Arbol de Piedra, meaning ‘Stone Tree’.

Named after its unique appearance which resembles a surrealist vision of a tree, the Arbol de Piedra is 5 meters tall and has been formed by the work of wind erosion over millions of years. The base of the tree predominantly consists of quartz which is sensitive to erosion from strong winds in the area. The winds here carry sandstone and salt which increases the erosional effect on the rock. The upper part of the Arbol de Piedra is made up of iron that has a stronger defense to the winds which is what gives the Arbol de Piedra its large mushroom shape.

Enjoy these breath-taking formations made of stone and maybe, some day you will get to see at least one of them!

Cristina David

The Point Where the Two Largest Oceans of the World meet

It is so good (at least that’s how I feel) when I find out new and interesting things about the world I live in. It is so rewarding whether it is achieved by reading or travelling. It’s always new knowledge. Useful, helpful, beautiful.

A fifty-mile waterway, connecting canals, rivers, and lakes with locks, was built through the narrowest part of Panama.

The cost was astronomical, but the end result was the realization of a dream. For, at last, the Atlantic and Pacific oceans were linked by a waterway. It was opened in 1914.

Now, ships could use the canal to shorten travel from New York to San Francisco and from Europe to the ports of Asia.

We all should know that despite an earlier failure by the French, in 1904 the U.S. began work on the Panama Canal, one of the modern world’s most ambitious engineering schemes.

The difference in density and salinity between the two oceans

Is it true that the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans don’t mix?

While we’ve given our planet’s oceans separate names, in reality there’s no border between them, and currents continually flow between them and mix their waters. The Atlantic and Pacific oceans ‘meet’ at the southernmost tip of South America. In this region, a strong current carries water from west to east, sweeping water from the Pacific into the Atlantic. The Straights of Juan del Fuego, at the tip of South America, (South of Argentina and Chile) is where the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean meet without mixing.

Salinity—the amount of dissolved salt in the water—is critical to so many aspects of the ocean, from circulation to climate to the global water cycle. … As oceanographers have known for many years—but now can “see”—the Atlantic Ocean is saltier than the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

The videos you may have seen online showing two different coloured bodies of water drifting alongside each other are actually showing light-coloured, sediment-rich freshwater from melted glaciers meeting dark, salty ocean water in the Gulf of Alaska (and over time, currents and eddies cause these to mix, too).

Watch the  first video that shows it to you.  Why do these waters not mix?  Because there is a huge difference in salinity between the clear water that comes from melting glaciers, which is cool and low in salt, while the water from the second ocean has a high salt concentration. Therefore, the two oceans have different densities, which makes them almost impossible to mix.

Also, a picture from the Gulf of Alaska that has been making the rounds on the Internet for the last few years – shows a strange natural phenomenon that occurs when heavy, sediment-laden water from glacial valleys and rivers pours into the open ocean. For reasons of security I could not post it. There in the gulf, the two types of water run into each other. Isn’t it awsome?

Cristina David

Valuable Reading Advice

We’re all readers here, but the kind of genres and topics we enjoy reading and learning more about can be vastly different. I, for instance, enjoy poetry, fiction, and history books, while others may not and they will prefer to read news articles and practical advice online or in magazines and newspapers. Neverthesame, we love readng and we can all agree that reading is a joyful and enriching experience, and becoming a better reader also means being more engaged with the surrounding world and more in touch with ourselves. But how can we accomplish that goal? Some of the world’s most vorociuous readers offer advice on this topic.

Only you decide what to read and what to avoid

The message of these words is simple and sensible: it is you who will benefit from and should enjoy the process of reading, and so it is also your freedom to choose what kinds of books to read and what topics to choose. An avid reader from his early childhood, Roosevelt was always stuck by the rule to read for at least a few minutes every day – a rule we should all definitely adopt, too!

Get acquainted with the classics

Einstein, one of the most forward-thinking minds of the 20th century, always said that it’s crucial to look back at the past and explore the writings of our ancestors. The great scientist firmly believed that without the wisdom of the past, people fall victim to the prejudices of the present and become nearsighted. Thus, to gain more perspective, go back to the basics, and explore the classics.

Reading the same book several times is a must

Continuing and building up the previous piece of advice is Lucius Annaeus Seneca (known as Seneca the Younger), a Roman Stoic philosopher, who stood by the thought that you have to re-read books over and over to really absorb and understand the wisdom imparted into them by their authors. The philosopher further specified that it’s better to limit yourself to a specific genre or group of like-minded authors at a time to get the most out of it, otherwise the message and intentions of the readings will slip away from you, being no more than a mere distraction from reality.

Don’t shy away from second-hand books!

If the quote we have selected puzzles you, let us set the context for it first, and you’ll soon understand what it intends to teach. These words are from Woolf’s essay titled “Street Haunting”, where she lays out the merits of second-hand book shopping. Here, Woolf intends to say that a street market full of books is like a treasure chest full of pleasant surprises, unexpected finds that you would never have intentionally selected. We must point out that the famous writer is, of course, right, as nothing warms the heart more than a surprise find! 

What you read in your leisure time reveals your true nature

This quote, too, is a perfect reflection of Oscar Wilde’s rebellious spirit we all cannot help but admire! If you have ever been told that the kind of books or articles you read are too simplistic or not worthy of your time, even though you really enjoy them, brush away those critical remarks. After all, your reading preferences are a reflection of your own personality and interests, and toxic comments that intend to prescribe certain preferences are only there to waste your time. As the famous writer also once wrote, “If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all”. And we hope you enjoyed and learned something useful from this article!

Share this article with those who love reading!

the source: https://www.ba-bamail.com

Cristina David

Meet the First Author in History – Enheduanna

The first author in recorded history is largely unknown, although, in her lifetime, she was the most powerful and famous person in the entire kingdom of Ur. We’re talking about Enheduanna, an ancient Sumerian high priestess, and a recognized author who had written 45 hymns and 3 epic poems before she was exiled from the kingdom. This was 4,300 years ago, and this is Enheduanna’s tragic and heroic life story.

Video – Youtube

When I came across this interesting and rather shocking piece of knowledge I decided it had to be shared , so here it is, just watch and form your own opinion!Make sure, I am not going to tell you mine!

Cristina David