Bluebirds of a feather

The Eastern Bluebirds

“A bird does not sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.” -Maya Angelou

Eastern bluebirds are the most widespread of the three types of bluebird. They’re found in in grasslands, forest clearings and meadows across a huge area from southern Canada to Central America.

A vibrant male Eastern Bluebird pirches proudly on the branch of a tree. Photo online

All bluebirds are cavity nesters, making their homes in the hollows of trees, often in holes vacated by bigger birds like woodpeckers. Nest boxes have also played a big part in helping the eastern bluebird population rebound after a steep decline in the early 20th century, due to reduced habitat and the introduction of non-native species, which compete with them for nesting holes.

An adult female Eastern Bluebird – photo- internet

Other types of bluebirds are the mountain bluebird and the western bluebird.

The eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) is a small North American migratory thrush found in open woodlands, farmlands and orchards.

The bright-blue breeding plumage of the male, easily observed on a wire or open perch, makes this species a favorite of birders. The male’s call includes sometimes soft warbles of jeew or chir-wi, or the melodious song chiti WEEW wewidoo.

I do hope that you fell in love with the minute bluebirds that make the meadows, the far away forests and the familiar orchards more beautiful, colorful and enjoyable. Their song is enchanting. Next time you see one, stop and listen to its chirping.

the source (partly) – the internet

Cristina David

Magic and mystery on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland

The Callanish Stones on Lewis predate Stonehenge. Photograph: Kippiss/Getty Images

Lewis is rich in treasures of many other kinds – historic, religious. ..First light at Callanish. This is one of those places where tourists find themselves mesmerized and overwhelmed by unexplained prehistoric formations of huge pillar- like stones displayed in unusual positions.

The stone circle on the Hebridean island of Lewis may be 5,000 years old, but it would not do to keep it waiting. Besides, coming here at daybreak is, from certain perspectives, positively tardy. Emma Rennie, a local photographer, considers 2am the best time to visit. “It’s beyond mindblowing,” she told me, ahead of my journey. “There’s silence, which the world is so short of nowadays, and millions of stars. I feel small and insignificant, and I love it.”

Callanish – or Calanais in Gaelic – comprises 49 standing stones laid out in a shape that, seen from above, suggests a Celtic cross. Despite this resemblance, the site long predates Christianity and, indeed, Stonehenge.

The world famous Calanais standing stones are older than Stonehenge and much more sculptural and beautiful. Erected 5,000 years ago, they were an important place for ritual activity for at least 2,000 years. The main complex contains around 50 stones in a cross formation, with 13 stones and a small chambered cairn in the inner circle.

This is one of the delights of Callanish, and something you can’t get from the photographs – the look of the stones up close, and the tingling pleasure of the way they feel beneath your palm. Swirls, crevices, bright patches of pink granite … each stone offers a drone’s-eye view of some desert landscape. The oystercatchers and swallows, peeping and piping overhead, have the right idea. Don’t get too close: you could get lost in those patterns and never find your way out again.

 The Callanish standing stones. Photograph: Murdo Macleod/The Guardian

What, though, was Callanish for? The idea that this was some sort of druidic temple draws the crowds, especially at the summer solstice. The visitor centre and information panels play it safe with a lot of “perhaps” and “possibly”; the purpose of the stones, they say, remains a mystery. When I visit Callanish expert Margaret Curtis at her home nearby, she offers greater certainty: the site, she believes, was built as a solar and lunar observatory.

“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existence. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery each day.” (Albert Einstein)

the source (partial) – Wikipedia

Cristina David

One of the most beautiful villages in France

“I travel because it makes me realize how much I haven’t seen, how much I’m not going to see, and how much I still need to see.” 

Apremont sur Allier

Located on the banks of the river Allier, not far from the confluence of this river wih the Loire this little mediaeval village full of charm and surprises, offers an authentic romantic and luring ballad.

The place is not just an old and picturesque village, it displays a magnificent park and one can visit a historic museum, The Stables and Carriage Museum.

Enter into the magic of this garden and let yourself be charmed by the colored and scented festival of the many varieties and species of trees, plants and flowers from all over the world.

The Park – Photo on the internet

The Park has been awarded the “Jardin Remarquable” label by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication.

The Park – Photo – the internet

Your fairytale walk will be punctuated by waterfalls, buildings and invitations to travel and to discover the talent of its fanciful designer, the great traveller and nature lover, Gilles de Brissac.

I hope you liked what you have seen in my post and some day you’ll decide to visit this mirific place on the Loire.

Cristina David

Enchanting Photos of Blue Dusk

There is a specific magical moment, on the cusp between day and evening, when the remaining light receives a blue glow and everything looks as if it’s the backdrop of a fairytale. German photographer Kilian Schoenberger dedicated a whole photo series to this special time of the day, which he calls the ‘magical border between the rational daylight world and the mystic realm of the night.’

Schoenberger explained further on the significance this blue hour has for him –  ‘it’s far more than just a special light mood. Especially when fog hides the landscape behind a white veil even familiar views turn into fantastic sceneries. Like a visual novelist, I’m trying to capture this daily transformation of the world with my camera.’

Take time now and enjoy the blue dusk views by the talented photographer below.

All these photos are truly breathtaking and dreamlike visions. I admit I did once or maybe twice in my life, notice similar unusual light perception in nature, but so many!!!

Enjoy each one of them and have a great day tomorrow!

Cristina David