The History of These Ancient Temples is Truly Fascinating

Among the earliest structures built by ancient civilizations, places of worship like tombs and temples were perhaps of the highest importance for the population of those days. In fact, of the buildings that still remain today from the early years of civilization, ancient temples are the most captivating and spectacular. You still can find several of the oldest known temples, built thousands of years ago, in different parts of the world today. While not all of them have been well-preserved, they still hold a magical allure and tell us of mysterious stories.. These old temples also help us get a better understanding of humanity’s earliest societies and what the world was like in those times. Some of the ancient temples featured in the list below are older than the written word itself, some have been built underground, and some have been able to maintain their architectural splendor even after thousands of years. Of all these ancient structures I only got the chance to visit The Temple of Apollo in Greece while taking a long trip throughout the country. It’s truly an amazing place! Take a look.

Temple of Amada, Egypt

The Temple of Amada is one of the oldest temples in Egypt and was first constructed by Egyptian pharaoh Thutmose III of the 18th dynasty, sometime around the 15th century BC. Dedicated to the gods Amun and Ra-Horakhty, the temple is considered to be one of the earliest examples of Egyptian temple architecture in the area of the Middle Nile. While it was originally constructed on the east bank of the Nile, the Temple of Amada was moved in the 1960s and ’70s to a higher site on Lake Nasser to protect it from flooding. One of the most significant features of the temple is a relief along with two important inscriptions describing the military feats of the pharaohs who built it – Tuthmosis III and his son Amenhotep II. While the temple is quite small and dilapidated, it is still quite fascinating and vibrant from inside.

Luxor Temple, Egypt

Located on the east bank of the Nile River in Luxor, in the ancient city of Thebes, the Luxor Temple was built in 1,100 and 1,600 BC during the reigns of several pharaohs – Amenhotep III (1390-52 BC), Tutankhamun (1336-27 BC), and Horemheb (1323-1295 BC), and then added to by Rameses II (1279-13 BC). The temple was dedicated to the three Egyptian gods Amun, Mut, and Chons, and is considered the largest and most important site in ancient Egypt.The Luxor temple served as a place of worship for nearly 3,500 years and was also the center of the festival of Opet (ancient Egyptian festival of the second month of the lunar calendar). According to Egyptian legends, the Luxor Temple was “the place of the First Occasion,” where the god Amun experienced a rebirth. Today, the massive Great Colonnade Hall is one of the most vital remains of this vast temple complex.

Hypogeum of Ħal-Saflieni, Malta

Image Source: Flickr/xiquinhosilva

Built around 2,500 BC, the Hypogeum in Malta is the oldest prehistoric underground temple in the world. The island of Malta has several Megalithic Temples and this structure is easily one of the most remarkable ones. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Hypogeum is one of the world’s best-preserved prehistoric sites and contains halls, chambers and passages carved out of rock. Archeologists believe that the Hypogeum was used as a temple as well as a sanctuary and a necropolis in prehistoric times. The complex is divided into three levels – the upper level (3600-3300 BC), the middle level (3300-3000 BC), and the lower level (3150 -2500 BC). Amazingly, the lower level has a room that is 10.6 meters (35 ft) underground. The structure was rediscovered in 1902 and was restored over mid-2016 to early 2017. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980.

Temple of Apollo, Greece

The Temple of Apollo is located at Delphi, the center of the Ancient Greek world, and was built on the location of two earlier temples. The temple was first built around the 7th century BC by the two iconic architects Trophonios and Agamedes and was rebuilt after a fire in the 6th century BC. The temple was of the Doric order and had 6 columns at the front, and 15 columns at the flanks.In 373 BC, the Temple of Apollo was destroyed by an earthquake and was rebuilt for the third time in 330 BC. Even after so many centuries, the foundations of the iconic temple still survive today along with several Doric columns that are made of porous stone and limestone. Not much is known about the temple’s interior arrangement. However, ancient writers have mentioned that the walls of the temple were inscribed with the aphorisms of the seven sages.

Tchogha Zanbil, Iran

Tchogha Zanbil or Choga Zambil is a ruined palace and temple complex of the ancient Elamite city of Dur Untashi in Iran. Built in 1250 BC, the temple was founded by the Elamite king Untash-Napirisha (1275-1240 BC). The primary feature of the complex is a gigantic ziggurat (a rectangular stepped tower built to honor the main god of the city) dedicated to the Elamite divinities Inshushinak and Napirisha. Outside of Mesopotamia, the ziggurat at Tchogha Zanbil remains the best-preserved monument of this type.Incidentally, the city was never completed and was attacked and damaged by the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal around 640 BC. The temple complex was excavated between 1946 to 1962 by archaeologist Roman Ghirshman after prospectors for an oil company discovered it in 1935.

 Vittala Temple, India

The Vittala Temple or Vitthala Temple in Hampi, India, is located near the banks of the Tungabhadra River in Karnataka. Among the many ancient temples at Hampi, the Vittala temple is the most well-renowned because of its stunning architecture and unmatched craftsmanship.Built in the 15th century by King Devaraya II (1422- 1446 AD) of the Vijayanagara Empire, the temple is dedicated to Lord Vittala or Krishna and is known for its iconic stone chariot and the unique musical pillars. Many sections of the temple were expanded and renovated during the reign of Krishnadevaraya (1509- 1529 AD). The temple is amazingly well-preserved and represents the epitome of ancient Indian architecture.

source of inspiration and reference : ba-bamail.com

Cristina David

A Gallery of the Most Expensive Paintings To Ever Be Sold

Are you a fan of the arts? Do you find pleasure in gazing at the bold brushstrokes and harmony, symmetry and great colors of the greatest artists of the world? I am, I do not know about you, though. Would you pay millions for a chance to hold one of those beauties? I know for sure that i would not do that, so I prefer the museums that house such fascinating works of art. I mean, even if I had such kind of money – an immense fortune , I would not spend it on matrialistic things. Their beauty, anyway is meant to be seen and admired by millions of art lovers around the world.

Over the years, the art world has grown, developed, and flourished, giving birth to new and varied forms and styles. But this development has in no way undercut the value of the paintings that came before it, both monetarily and creatively. From the 15th century to the 20th, the champions of the art movement wowed us with their skill. Today, their passion remains forever memorialized in their work, and their work remains pristinely preserved in museums, galleries, and private collections around the world. 

In fact, some private collectors and eccentric art connoisseurs have paid exorbitant amounts of money to ensure a Picasso or Monet classic ends up in their collections and no one else’s. This highly lucrative posthumous industry has gotten increasingly competitive over the years, but who could say that these gorgeous paintings that sculpted the history of art aren’t worth 6 figure sums? From least to most expensive, these are the unmissable, the incomparable, and the irreplaceable – the highest valued paintings in the world.

Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, by Gustav Klimt – Sold for $135 Million

(By Gustav Klimt, Wikimedia Commons)  

Also known as the Lady in Gold, this portrait was painted by Austrian artist Gustav Klimt between 1903 and 1907, during a time that was deemed to be the artist’s “Golden Phase”. Its current owner, Ronald Lauder, purchased it for the above-mentioned heavy sum in a private sale and has it proudly on display in New York’s Neue Galerie. 

Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II, by Gustav Klimt – Sold for $150 Million

(By Gustav Klimt, Wikimedia Commons)  

This painting was the second formal painting of this gorgeous lady, created by Klimt in 1912, 5 years after the first and more famous work. After a long legal battle, the Bloch-Bauer family took possession of the painting in 2006 and sold it to Oprah Winfrey. 10 years later, the television mogul sold it for the high price of $150 million to an unknown buyer in China. 

Le Rêve (The Dream), by Pablo Picasso – Sold for $155 Million 

This work of art, depicting the painter’s mistress in the throes of sleep, was created in 1932 and was owned by Steven Wynn for well over a decade. In 2006, when the piece was set to be sold to billionaire Steve Cohen, Wynn accidentally ran his elbow into the masterpiece in a now-infamous gathering at his office. While nothing can fix the faux pas of making a hole in a Picasso painting, the painting was restored and finally sold to Cohen in 2013 for the price of $155 million. 

Nu Couché (Sur Le Côté Gauche), by Amedeo Modigliani – Sold for $157.2 Million

(By Amedeo Modigliani, Wikimedia Commons)  

Created in 1917 by Amedeo Modigliani, an Italian artist known for his portraiture and nude art, this piece remains one of the painter’s largest works. Though it is not the most famous of his nude works, it is a distinctly unique piece for his style and was sold in 2018 to an anonymous bidder for slightly more than the estimated $150 million at a Sotheby’s auction in New York. 

Masterpiece, by Roy Lichtenstein – Sold for $165 Million 

Painted in 1962 by American pop artist Roy Lichtenstein, “Masterpiece” is one of this artist’s most famous works, and is still considered by many to be an amusingly accurate portrayal of the artist’s own career. Naturally, the one person who absolutely had to have this delightful tongue-in-cheek love letter to comic illustrations and painting was collector and mogul Steve Cohen who purchased it in 2017. 

Pendant Portraits of Maerten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit, by Rembrandt van Rijn – Sold for $180 Million 

(Left: Portrait of Maerten Soolmans, By Rembrandt, Wikimedia Commons / Right: Portrait of Oopjen Coppit, By Rembrandt, Wikimedia Commons

These two portraits by famous Dutch artist Rembrandt depict a wedding pair individually on the eve of their marriage. Originally owned by the wealthy Rothschild family, the pendant portraits were jointly purchased by Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum and the Louvre for the hefty sum mentioned. As it has been universally deemed unacceptable to separate the couple, the museums take turns displaying them, with the Louvre currently caring for them. 

Nafea Faa Ipoipo, Paul Gauguin – Sold for $210 Million 

(By Paul Gauguin, Wikimedia Commons)  

This piece is titled “When Will You Marry?” in English, with the original title being the Tahitian translation, and was created in 1892 by French Post-Impressionist Paul Gauguin. It was originally owned for over 50 years by Swiss businessman Rudolf Staechelin and his family, after his passing, and was frequently on loan to the Kunstmuseum in Switzerland. In 2015, it was sold by them to Sheikha Al-Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani, a member of the ruling family of Qatar.

The Card Player, by Paul Cézanne – Sold for $250 Million 

(By Paul Cézanne, Wikimedia Commons)  

Paul Cézanne was and continues to remain “the father of us all” as proclaimed by Picasso, as his works inspired many artists that followed. The Card Players is an iconic painting whose place in history was always solidified but gained another layer of armor in 2012 when it was purchased by the Royal family of Qatar. It remained at the very top of the list of most expensive paintings until 2015. 

Salvator Mundi, by Leonardo Da Vinci – Sold for $450.3 Million 

(By Leonardo da Vinci, Wikimedia Commons)  

This piece by renowned artist Leonardo Da Vinci depicts a near-angelic Jesus Christ making a cross sign with his fingers while holding a crystal sphere. For many years, the authenticity of the painting was in question with many claiming the piece was either a copy of Da Vinci’s original lost work or created by one of his disciples in a similar manner. 

However, most experts have now determined the painting to be legitimate and in 2017, at an auction at Christie’s in New York, this piece was purchased for a record-shattering price by Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince, on behalf of Abu Dhabi’s Department of Culture and Tourism. Fun fact: the previous owner of the painting at the time of its auction was Dmitry Rybolovlev, who purchased it from none other than Yves Bouvier.

A few quotes about Art :

I am seeking. I am striving. I am in it with all my heart.” – Vincent Van Gogh

Creativity takes courage.” – Henry Matisse

Don’t be an art critic, but paint, there lies salvation.”- Paul Cezanne

Yes , indeed, Art means hard work, a lot of practice and takes a lot of courage!

Share this article with those who love art!

reference – https://commons.wikimedia.org

Cristina David

Fascinating Facts About Paris

Thomas Jefferson once said, “a walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of life.” He wasn’t wrong. There’s a reason that Paris is one of the most popular cities in the world and captivates all of us. Known as the “City of Light” or the “City of Love,” the streets of Paris gush with culture, art, beauty, and history. 

While we have all seen glorious pictures of the French capital, but there’s still a lot you may not know about it. For instance, did you know that Paris wasn’t always called “Paris”? And do you know what the city’s motto is? Here, we have listed some little-known and interesting facts about Paris that you are unlikely to know. Check them out./

1. Pont Neuf is the oldest bridge in Paris

Pont neuf, Ile de la Cite, Paris – France

It was built from 1578 to 1607 and was designed by Baptiste Du Cerceau and Pierre des Illes. It was the city’s first path-breaking public work and introduced them to a new kind of street life.

2. The motto of Paris is “Fluctuat nec mergitur”

small paris street with view on the famous paris eifel tower on a cloudy rainy day with some sunshine

This means ‘Tossed but not sunk,’ or ‘Beaten by the waves, but does not flounder.’ This phrase is most commonly found on Paris’ coat of arms and suggests resilience, courage, and inner strength. 

3. Paris was founded around the end of the 3rd century BC and was initially called Lutetia.

Paris cityscape taken from Montmartre

The city was founded around the end of the 3rd century BC by a Celtic tribe called Parisii who had settled on the banks of the Seine. In 52 BC, the village was conquered by the Romans, who went on to establish it as a Gallo-Roman town called Lutetia. The city changed its name to Paris during the 4th century.

4. Paris was among the first cities in the world to install street lights.

It is said that the first public lamp in Paris was the famous candle lantern placed in front of the Grand Chatelet in 1318. The first gas lamps were placed in the Place du Carrousel in 1829. By 1900, there were around 50,900 street lamps in Paris.

5. The oldest house in Paris was built in 1407

51 rue de Montmorency

The house is located at 51 rue de Montmorency and was built by the city’s most famous alchemist, Nicolas Flamel, in 1407. Historians believe that this is the house where Flamel carried out his experiments in alchemy.

6.The oldest café in Paris has been around since 1686

Café Procope is the oldest and among the most famous eateries in the city. It is known as the first literary cafe in the world and was opened in 1686 by the Sicilian chef Procopio Cutò. The café is said to have played a major part in setting up the café culture in Paris.

7. Cheese shops in Paris have more than 1000 different varieties of French Cheese

Wine and Cheese Shop – French Wine and Cheese Shop in Paris

You will be spoilt for choice when looking for French cheese in Paris. From the soft and creamy Camembert to the rich and firm Comté, you won’t be able to try out all the varieties in one trip.

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source : https://www.ba-bamail.com

Cristina David

The Sea Secrets

The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.     

Jacques Yves Cousteau

Have you ever wondered why the sea has such a magnetic attraction to us?

Its infinity attracts us, our souls dream of boundlessness because they are part of the endless universe.

Looking for hours at the waves and listening to their enchanting, ceaseless, rythmic song we might get a glimpse of ETERNITY.

Cristina David

A few Quotes to Cherish from Princess Diana

Diana Spencer was born on July 1, 1961, near Sandringham, England. She only became Lady Diana in 1975, after her father inherited the title of Earl Spencer. Diana who was described as a jolly and lively kid and teenager, and her husband-to-be Prince Charles met in 1977, while he was reportedly involved with her older sister, Sarah Spencer. Despite their 13-year age gap, their courtship moved quickly. The couple got married in what was dubbed the “Wedding of the Century” when Diana was 20 years old.

The Princess of Wales is known to have broken the rigid royal traditions quite a few times, for example, she was the first member of the royal family to give birth at a hospital rather than the palace. This may have contributed, in a way, to her becoming one of the most popular and beloved royals in history. However, it is mostly due to her humanitarian work and approachability.

Princess Diana was always eager to meet with people of all ages and backgrounds while traveling and refused to wear gloves when greeting people, which was customary for royals. 

She passed away when she was only 36, on August 31, 1997. Princess Diana will always be remembered as the people’s princess. She won the hearts of many around the world with her grace, compassion, and generosity. We hope you get inspired by some of her most powerful words.  

1. “Only do what your heart tells you.”

Quotes by Princess Diana “Only do what your heart tells you.”Image Source: John Mathew Smith / Wikimedia Commons

2. “Everyone needs to be valued. Everyone has the potential to give something back.”

Quotes by Princess Diana “Everyone needs to be valued. Everyone has the potential to give something back.” Image Source: Russ2009 / Wikimedia Commons

3. “They say it is better to be poor and happy than rich and miserable, but how about a compromise like moderately rich and just moody?”

Quotes by Princess Diana “They say it is better to be poor and happy than rich and miserable, but how about a compromise like moderately rich and just moody?”Related: A Side of Princess Diana We Have Never Seen Before

4. “When you are happy you can forgive a great deal.”

Quotes by Princess Diana “When you are happy you can forgive a great deal.”

5. “Hugs can do great amounts of good – especially for children.”

Quotes by Princess Diana “Hugs can do great amounts of good – especially for children.”Like

6. “Carry out a random act of kindness, with no expectation of reward, safe in the knowledge that one day someone might do the same for you.” 

Quotes by Princess Diana “Carry out a random act of kindness"

source – https://www.ba-bamail.com

Quotes by Princess Diana “Everyone of us needs to show how much we care for each other"
Quotes by Princess Diana  “I want my boys to have an understanding of people’s emotions"
Quotes by Princess Diana "“I don’t go by the rule book… I lead from the heart, not the head.”
Quotes by Princess Diana "I touch people. I think everyone needs that."
Quotes by Princess Diana “I don’t want expensive gifts"

Helen Keller – an Inspirational Author, a Profoundly Powerful Woman

Helen Keller was born to a large affluent family in Tuscumbia, Alabama, in 1880 and lived with her parents and four siblings on their historic homestead, Ivy Green. On her mother’s side, she was related to a number of prominent New England families. Helen’s father, Arthur Keller, was a captain in the Confederate army. The family lost most of its wealth during the Civil War and lived modestly. At the age of 19 months, Helen became deaf and blind as a result of an unknown illness, perhaps rubella or scarlet fever. As Helen grew from infancy into childhood, she became wild and unruly. She was initially able to communicate only with the young daughter of the family’s cook using signs, and within the next few years, she discovered more than 60 home signs she used to communicate with her family. She could even determine who was approaching by distinguishing between the vibrations of people’s footsteps. 

As she so often remarked as an adult, her life changed on March 3, 1887. On that day, Anne Mansfield Sullivan (a visually impaired woman herself) came to Tuscumbia to be her teacher, especially to teach her how to communicate. She was just 14 years older than her pupil Helen, and she too suffered from serious vision problems. Anne underwent many botched operations at a young age before her sight was partially restored. Though the process was slow and frustrating for young Helen, she eventually became determined to learn the name of every item in this world that had previously escaped her. A whole new world had opened up for her, and though she had remained isolated for the initial years of her life, she maintained her connection to the beauty offered by music and books. At age 24, Helen became the first deaf-blind person to earn a bachelor of arts degree. 

Helen’s pursuit of goodness and greatness was unfaltering, and over the years, she learned to communicate using the spoken word by observing and imitating the mouth movements of others. She went on to write numerous books, autobiographical and other, as well as give lectures and speeches on her life and overcoming seemingly impossible difficulties.

During seven trips between 1946 and 1957, she visited 35 countries on five continents. She met with world leaders such as Winston Churchill, Jawaharlal Nehru, and Golda Meir. She became a celebrity, therefore.

She was a suffragist, an advocate for people with disabilities, a political activist, and a profoundly powerful woman. Her words have been the result of a long and strenuous but ultimately victorious battle that reminds us that we should always have hope and always keep fighting! 

I will post here a few of her renowned motivational sayings that might be helpful to many of us.

“Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope.” 

“No pessimist ever discovered the secret of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land, or opened a new doorway for the human spirit.” 

“When all you can feel are the shadows, turn your face towards the sun.”

“Each day comes to me with both hands full of possibilities.”  

“Face your deficiencies and acknowledge them; but do not let them master you. Let them teach you patience, sweetness, insight.”

“The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision.” 

I wish you to overcome all the obstacles in your life the way Helen did, with so much determination, undeterred by her disabilities!

Cristina David

10 Hoax Cures of the Coronavirus You Must Ignore

You cannot escape news about the coronavirus these days. It’s everywhere! This isn’t a surprise, as the pandemic has spread rapidly across the globe. However, as reports of coronavirus cases keep coming in, so does the steady stream of bogus claims on how to cure or prevent yourself from it. 

For the record, the FDA (the US Food and Drug Administration) had issued an open letter, warning, “There currently are no vaccines, pills, potions, lotions, lozenges or other prescription or over-the-counter products available to treat or cure coronavirus disease.”

Eating garlic can protect you from the coronavirus – one example of a hoax remedy

Despite these warnings, the hoax reports keep piling on. Since people are desperate for finding a cure to escape this disease, many of them latch on to any claim they can find, howsoever absurd they might be. While some of these claims are outright ridiculous, many are actually harmful and risky. Here, we have compiled some of the most absurd hoax cures to treat the novel coronavirus that should be completely avoided. 

Share this post with your friends and family…

Stay safe and healthy!

Cristina David

How to improve our declining vision

More than ANY other sense, we use our vision the most on a daily basis. However, the National Eye Institute reports that age-related vision decline happens to everyone. Small warning signs now can mean devastating problems around the corner.  

Declining eyesight is one of the biggest signs of old age. Perhaps words are getting blurier or driving is getting a bit more scary. Maybe your own children treat you like you’re delicate and fragile, always asking if you should be driving.

Besides vitamins and medical treatments for the eye, there are natural remedies such as carrots in your diet and the simple, decorative plant in your home, called aloe vera!

If you have problems with your eyesight, you might want to watch this video:

Try this, you may be glad you did!

Cristina David

Ein Gedi the most picturesque oasis in the world

An awsome Nature Reserve

En Gedi is the biggest oasis in Israel. It has springs and waterfalls, and flowing brooks at the foot of the cliffs, home to ibexes and rock hyraxes. Situated on the eastern border of the Judean Desert, on theDead Sea shore, Ein Gedi is a real jewel of Israel.

Foto: Wikimedia

I visited Israel recently, but never got to see it although I was not too far from it. On that day of my pilgrimage I just contemplated the desolate look oh the Dead Sea, after coming from other jewels one can admire in the desert : very old, impressive monasteries, holy places of spiritual life.

While the Ein Gedi Nature Reserve offers over nine different hiking trails, suitable for everyone from family groups to experienced hikers, and ranging in duration from just half an hour in length to a full day, some of the most popular hiking trails are those which head through Wadi David.

King David fall and cave

Whichever of the hikes you decide to take, you are likely to gaze in awe at the beauty of Ein Gedi Nature Reserve, and be amazed in particular at how it contrasts to its desert surroundings. The springs are a source of beauty today, and have, for thousands of years, been the source upon which life, both human and otherwise, has relied upon for living in the area.

The reserve has two streams which flow year round, and four springs which feed the streams. This hike passes through the David stream and three of the four springs. The David stream has a series of waterfalls and pools and descends 200 meters to the height of the Dead Sea.

The Nahal David lower stream – the internet

Flora in the nature reserve includes the acacia, Sodom apple, Christ-thorn, reeds and cattails. Fauna in the reserve includes foxes, wolves, hyenas, and leopards, as well as the commonly seen ibex and hyrax.

Hoping you will have the occasion to see these great views, I wish you to stay safe and healthy amid this ugly pandemic.

https://www.attractions-in-israel.com

Cristina David

These Old Films Will Make You Love Black-and-White Cinema

Back in the first half of the 20th century, films were mostly made in black and white. But as the color film came into existence, black-and-white movies slowly faded into the background. However, these days, many filmmakers are trying to go back to the black-and-white cinema to accentuate the story or add more aesthetics to their films. This is why many of the old black-and-white movies still hold so much charm even decades later.

Today, we will have a look at some of the best classic black-and-white flicks that have stood the test of time. These old movies may be devoid of the vivid color palettes we are used to seeing in films today, but they are beautiful time-capsuled stories that are not just remnants of cinema’s glorious past but are also immensely entertaining even today.

‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ is an evergreen classic and no black-and-white movie list can be complete without this beloved Frank Capra film.

This timeless Christmas tale tells the story of George Bailey (Jimmy Stewart), who, overwhelmed by life’s trials, is about to give it all up. That too, during Christmas. However, just as he is about to take his life, his Guardian Angel, Clarence, appears and shows the man how his life would have turned out had he never been born. George sees the positive impact he’s had on his town, family, and friends and looks at his life in a completely new light. 

Nothing quite lifts us like the heartwarming and wholesome ending of this film where George runs through the streets of Bedford Falls declaring, “I wanna live, Clarence! I wanna live!”

Orson Wells’ first and greatest movie Citizen Kane is often hailed as one of the greatest movies ever made. Even today, almost eighty years after its initial release in 1941, the movie still stands out because of how innovative the movie was for its time.

The entire film is a flashback and that was considered groundbreaking for the era. It tells the story of Charles Foster Kane, an incredibly affluent newspaper publisher, and industrial magnate. When a reporter is assigned to figure out Kane’s dying words „Rosebud”, the investigation eventually reveals a remarkable portrait of a complex man who rose from nowhere to reach astonishing heights. It’s a captivating mystery and a brilliant character study that still gets us hooked.

The Master Of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, made many memorable movies. However, Psycho is still recalled the most often because of how chilling it was.

This is the story of Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins) who lives with his mother in a worn-out house that overlooks the motel he runs. The motel doesn’t see a lot of visitors, though, because of an interstate highway that was built to carry travelers away from the road.

On one rainy night, a woman, who’s on the run from the police, checks into the motel. She interacts with Norman and his mother and what follows is a captivating mystery that unravels in the most terrifying way. The music, the setting, the direction, and the mystery all make Psycho a hair-raising watch even today.

This is another Frank Capra classic that is widely considered to be one of the best romantic comedies ever made. The film stars Claudette Colbert as the spoilt heiress Ellie Andrews and Clark Gable as the cynical yet resourceful reporter Peter Warne.

Ellie has run away from the clutches of her rich father who had decided to hold her captive after she eloped with a man he believes is after his money. Ellie meets Clark in her travels and the reporter offers to help the young woman reunite with her new husband in exchange for an exclusive story. However, the more he interacts with the feisty Ellie, the more Clark begins to fall for her.

It Happened One Night clinched the „Best Picture” Oscar along with, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay. 

Even if you haven’t watched the film, it is more than likely that you’ve at least heard of Casablanca. “Here’s looking at you, kid,” is probably one of the most quotable lines from a movie and Casablanca has quite a few memorable ones. 

The story is quite simple. Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart), who owns a nightclub in the Moroccan city of Casablanca, discovers that his old flame Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) is in town with her husband in the midst of World War II. Ilsa wants to escape to America with her husband, and Rick is the only one who can make that possible. However, Ilsa’s feelings for Rick soon resurface and what follows is an intricate play of emotions between the one-time lovers. 

Share this post with other cinema lovers!

Cristina David

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