Bluebirds of a feather

The Eastern Bluebirds

“A bird does not sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.” -Maya Angelou

Eastern bluebirds are the most widespread of the three types of bluebird. They’re found in in grasslands, forest clearings and meadows across a huge area from southern Canada to Central America.

A vibrant male Eastern Bluebird pirches proudly on the branch of a tree. Photo online

All bluebirds are cavity nesters, making their homes in the hollows of trees, often in holes vacated by bigger birds like woodpeckers. Nest boxes have also played a big part in helping the eastern bluebird population rebound after a steep decline in the early 20th century, due to reduced habitat and the introduction of non-native species, which compete with them for nesting holes.

An adult female Eastern Bluebird – photo- internet

Other types of bluebirds are the mountain bluebird and the western bluebird.

The eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) is a small North American migratory thrush found in open woodlands, farmlands and orchards.

The bright-blue breeding plumage of the male, easily observed on a wire or open perch, makes this species a favorite of birders. The male’s call includes sometimes soft warbles of jeew or chir-wi, or the melodious song chiti WEEW wewidoo.

I do hope that you fell in love with the minute bluebirds that make the meadows, the far away forests and the familiar orchards more beautiful, colorful and enjoyable. Their song is enchanting. Next time you see one, stop and listen to its chirping.

the source (partly) – the internet

Cristina David